Lassitude – An Addendum

So, on my last post I noted that I’d be going to the lab at the hospital this morning to get my blood tested in preparation for my Daratumumab infusion on Thursday. I told you I’d let you know how it went. Well, I texted the lab at 9 AM. We can get on a wait list if we text the lab. They text back when it’s our turn. I always do that to avoid sitting in the lab waiting room with a lot of sick people. We then immediately drove to the hospital. We got to the hospital at 9:40. I was 37th in line at that point. I waited in the car while Carolyn took Tilly for a walk. 

I got my blood taken at 10:40. Not as bad as it could have been, especially on a Monday morning. When I told the lab tech that I was quite disappointed that VIHA had closed all the satellite labs in the Valley, she said that if they had left them open, they might not be run off their feet at the hospital lab. But then we agreed that staffing was a problem. 

Getting my blood tested within ninety-six hours of my infusion is a must. They won’t proceed with the infusion if my blood shows any kind of wonkiness. In the last few months it’s been brilliant! Last month there was no sign at all of myeloma protein in my blood. Everything is going fine with me on that front. My chemotherapy is very effective and there is no trace of myeloma protein in my blood. 

I had a consult with my local GP/Oncologist about ten days ago. We discussed the possibility of my going off chemo for a short time, but I figured it would be best to wait until I spoke with an oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency next month to entertain such a course of action. I feel so fortunate that I have great care and my prognosis is excellent. Myeloma used to be a killer. It still is, but it’s not a quick killer. It takes its time now. There are some amazing chemo meds that account for the progress being made in the survivability of myeloma patients. The trope now is that we’ll more likely die with myeloma than because of it. Fair enough. Obviously, I want to live longer, but I’m not keen on following my father in the way he died. 

It’s clear that some of my current lassitude is caused by my chemo and pain meds. However, the fact that I’m almost seventy-five is also an important factor. As we were driving to the hospital for my consult with Dr. Bakshi, I happened to notice a cyclist pushing hard along Piercy Road on the way to Highway 19. He was maybe in his fifties. This scene reminded me of years gone by when I rode my bike on this same stretch of road. I’d get tired alright, but I had plenty of strength and endurance. I could easily ride forty or fifty kilometres back then. I still have my bike. It’s a good cruising bike, but I’m almost afraid to get on it because my balance is off, and that’s not good for bike riding. I may give it a shot again. We’ll see.

I guess what I’m saying is that each stage of life has its own characteristics. It’s a bit crazy to think that we should be able to do at seventy-five what we did easily at forty-five or fifty-five. Certainly, there are some people who can still engage at seventy-five in some impressive physical activity. I know some of them, but I’m definitively not one of them. As my GP noted too, having a nap in the afternoon at my age isn’t beyond the moral pale. Today, I didn’t nap in the afternoon. I went down to my shop instead. I had some energy. Better not to waste it. I’m hoping to sleep a little better tonight because of it, but there is a confounding variable in my sleep patterns. Her name is Princess Pretty Paws and last night she damned near drove me crazy. She started meowling at 2:30 or so and carried on for most of the rest of the night. She’s lucky to be alive. 😉

Lassitude

Yes, lassitude, which the dictionary that Apple so kindly provides for us as part of the operating system on my computer defines as: “a state of physical or mental weariness; lack of energy.” That about sums it up. 

I know my expectations for myself are way out of whack. I keep forgetting the basic realities of my life: I’m almost seventy-five years old, I have a slow acting, but debilitating cancer and chemotherapy designed to fight said cancer that has side effects I’ve already discussed on this blog at nauseum. No need to flog a dead horse (as they say). I also have some neck issues that most people of my age get but that don’t afflict all of us in this demographic with pain. We won’t talk about arthritis now, shall we? 

So, I’m tired and generally not feeling that great. What should I expect? Duh! 

The past month has been especially unpleasant. My computer tells me that I’ve spent about nine hours a day of screen time. That seems about right. I’ve watched a lot of YouTube videos on everything from sailing to boat building, to prospecting, art, art history, lumber manufacturing, bushcraft, the La Palma volcano, people living alone in off-grid cabins, American Congressional politics, and more. Nine hours a day. It’s true that I also read quite a few articles from The Guardian, The Tyee, NPR, the CBC, and lots of internet-based news sources. And I’ve written a bit too. Still, I do a lot of sitting in my recliner, staring at my computer screen. I often think about things I could be doing like drawing, painting, woodwork, etcetera. Sometimes I do these things, generally followed by increased pain in my back and legs. That doesn’t encourage me to do more things. In fact, it actively discourages me from doing things. So, I go back to my recliner for another few hours. This pattern seems to be my fate now. I’m not sure I can do anything about it either.

Today is Sunday and this week is my chemo week. This is the fourth week in my monthly cycle and for the fourth week I don’t take lenalidomide, a drug I would normally take daily. On Thursday I take dexamethasone, valacyclovir, montelukast, and get one and a half hour of a Daratumumab infusion. That’s all no big deal. However, the effects of these meds will leave me feeling like I’ve got the flu for at least a week after. 

Tomorrow, I have to go to the lab for blood tests. So, VIHA has now closed all satellite labs in the Valley leaving only the lab at the hospital. There used to be three satellite labs, one in Cumberland, one in Courtenay, and one at St-Joseph’s hospital. All gone now. Apparently, VIHA can’t find enough staff. There are no appointments to be had either for tomorrow, and I need lab results tomorrow to be able to get my infusion on Thursday. I may spend the better part of the day tomorrow at the hospital waiting to get my blood tested. That will not put a smile on my face. But, we’ll see. I’ll report back on my next post.

Do I sound like I’m complaining and whining? Well, I am.

#79. My Numbers!

This is the post I’ve been looking forward to writing for some time now. It documents a radical improvement in my myeloma situation. Now, if only I could find a way to rapidly decrease the problems and pain I get from arthritis and degenerative disk syndrome, I would almost be back to a normal life. Of course, I keep forgetting that I’m 74 years old and that I’ll never be able to do the things now that I used to do just ten years ago. But enough grousing about my limitations, it’s time to focus on some recent victories that have everything to do with my numbers.

For me, the one thing that came along with the diagnosis of multiple myeloma or bone marrow cancer was (and is) an obsession and fascination with my numbers. I wrote about this earlier in a blog post on December 17th, 2019 (https://rogerjgalbert.com/2019/12/17/access-to-medical-records/). Now is a good time to revisit my obsession with my numbers because I’ve recently had some pretty spectacular changes in some of my critical numbers. I concur with Paul Kleutghen when he writes:”We (patients and caregivers) have all become so attuned to focusing on numbers that any excursion out of the “normal” causes worries and sleepless nights.”* I generally don’t lose sleep over anything, but, like Kleutghen, I am focussed on my numbers, and I get pretty upset if my numbers are going in the wrong direction or stand outside of the reference numbers.** Of course it’s an entirely different story when my numbers go in the right direction. Numbers are important to me and you’ll see why in this post.

My numbers refers to the lab results I get from frequent visits to the Vancouver Island Heath Authority (VIHA) lab in Courtenay, or to the hospital lab. As a regular thing I get checks of my blood, my white blood cells, red blood cells, monocytes, hemoglobin, neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, etcetera. I also get regular tests of my kidney function by analysis of creatinine in my blood serum. (I have access to all my lab results through an online VIHA service called MyHealth.). By the way, a really good source of information about reading our lab results can be found here: http://media.myelomacentral.com/wp-content/uploads/UnderstandingYourLabResults.pdf.

Once a month or so I get tested for more myeloma specific indicators in my blood serum. These are paraproteins and free light chains, both kappa and lambda. Our blood has both Free Light Chains and Heavy Chains. These are simply descriptions of the organization of proteins in our blood serum. Without getting into too much technical detail it’s important to note that some myeloma patients are kappa free light chain myeloma patients and some are lambda free light chain myeloma patients. I’m a lambda kind of guy.

So, I went on a new chemo regimen in January. It’s composed of dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid, lenalidomide, a chemo drug (they’re not sure how it works) and Daratumumab, a monoclonal antibody. If your eyes haven’t glassed over yet from all the technical jargon I invite you to have a look at the table below I got from MyHealth. It refers to my Lambda Free Light Chains from June, 2020 to February 26th, 2021. It’s a very informative table. The red numbers highlight times when the lab results indicated that I had lambda free light chains higher than the reference range, which is conveniently given on the right in the table. You can see that from September 30th, 2020 until January 27th, 2021 that the myeloma was getting more active again in my blood, a conclusion supported by the redness of the numbers therein. Not only that, but you can see that the amount of free light chains in my blood was increasing rapidly during that time from 44.2 milligrams per litre of blood on September 30th 2020 to 201 milligrams per litre of blood on January 27, 2021, but in fact had been increasing from June 30, 2020. That was a very worrying trend because the more free light chains in my blood the sicker I get.

Then I started the new course of chemotherapy and the lambda free light chains in my blood went from 201 to 11.7 mg/l a number well within the reference range. That”s why I got so excited when I saw the ‘normal’ 11.7 mg/L on February 26th, just a few days ago. In my discussion with my oncologist in Victoria, he said that we shouldn’t expect to see any positive results for two to three months and here I went from a high of 201 to 11.7 in a month! Now, that is cause for celebration. It means that the Daratumumab is my buddy and is working better than expected. Hallelujah!

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*https://www.myelomacrowd.org/living-with-abnormal-free-light-chain-ratios/

**reference numbers are a range of numbers within which numbers should fit in a ‘normal’ person. Reference numbers are where the majority of people would fit in terms of their standing on any particular measure. It’s a range because there is understandable variation from patient to patient. For example for Kappa Free Light Chains the reference range is 3.30 – 19.40 mg/L.