Ho Hum.

I guess it’s not really ho hum, but my life is definitely just ticking along. The ‘injuries’ I’ve sustained via myeloma and chemotherapy have prevented me from doing a lot of physical activity, but I keep getting the medical people telling me to stay active! It’s a tightrope I walk. Well, not a real tightrope, but you know what I mean. Do exercise? Pay for it afterwards for days with pain and joints that do not want to move. Don’t do exercise? Shorten my life and make moving around increasingly difficult. This is no fun. Well, it’s true that it’s no fun. Pain is no fun. But who promised me that I would have fun all the time? Fun is for the young and healthy, or at least for the healthy (of all ages). I really don’t expect to have ‘fun’ anymore. Should I be having fun? What kind of fun should I be having? Is there more than one kind of fun I should be having? Is reading a book fun? What kind of fun can I have when my left knee keeps wanting to fold on me without warning? If I get down on the floor, I may not be able to get up again. That’s no fun…I guess, although it might be fun for somebody to watch me try to get up off the floor. Is betting fun?

I really like this time of year. It’s cool in the shade and warm in the sun. We walked on the River Walkway this afternoon. It was cool in the shade and warm in the sun. We had iced coffee. Yummy. Is having an iced coffee on a warm, sunny afternoon on the River Walkway fun? I don’t know. Maybe I was having fun. I’m not sure.

I was going to write about pain and death today, but then I decided to keep it light. Pain and death are heavy. Fun is light! Long live fun! I DO really want to have fun, to possess it, to keep it close to me and give it a big hug but I’m not sure that’s the way it works.

You might think that chemo is no fun. Well, you might be wrong. Being hooked up to an infusion machine for a couple of hours has its moments. There’s no pain involved, but being tethered to a ‘tree’ with bags of saline solution and meds flapping around presents certain challenges when the need for a pee break presents itself. Thankfully, the ‘trees’ we use have battery powered brains and can be unplugged from the wall sockets. That way we (I in particular) can wheel them around to the bathroom and pee while we hang on to them and try not to pee on the lines. It’s difficult because the lines hang down quite far, often right in front of my pant zipper. It’s fine for women because you sit down to pee but for us guys the danger is omnipresent. Of course I can sit down to pee, but my anatomy resists that. The issue is compounded because the toilet seat in the bathroom attached to the Cancer Care Centre won’t stay up. That means I either have to hold it up while I also hold up the lines and other things or pee on the seat. Yes, the damned toilet has a slot in the front/middle but I’m not that great at aiming my stream which is erratic at the best of times. I don’t have the straight-as-an-arrow powerful stream I used to have in my youth. I used to be able to control my pee stream with little effort. Now I’m just glad when I can pee at all. I’ve gotten very used to just standing in front of a urinal or a toilet for several minutes at a time just waiting for pee to happen. It always wants to come, it’s always right there…but no. It can get embarrassing if there are other people around also waiting to use the ‘facilities’. It’s especially bad in theatres when at half time break during a musical performance or a play when peeing is so important but I just stand there with ten guys in line behind me waiting. Damn! So embarrassing. But what a relief when it finally happens. Now that’s a lot of fun!

The nurses in the Chemo Centre are a lot of fun. We joke around as they try to find a vein in my arm to poke. My veins resist entry. They hide very well. It’s a challenge for the nurses to find a vein in my arm on the first try. It gets a bit messy if it goes to three tries. If it does go to three tries the first nurse generally gives up and lets another nurse have a go. Whoa. That’s a lot of pressure to perform! I freak them out by pointing to good possible spots then watch them stick the needle in. They think that’s weird. Most people look away when they get poked. One of the nurses gave me a soft ball the size of a tennis ball to squeeze all day long. That, apparently, makes the veins stand out. I think it may be working. She got it first try last time I was in.

I talk to my local oncologist next Wednesday. That will be fun. He’s a nice guy. We always have pleasant conversations. Did I say I like this time of year? Well, I do. Summer is almost over so I can get back to regular blogging. I must say, I’ve been lazy this summer and have been hooked on cat videos on YouTube. I’ve also gotten tired of writing about chemo and the life of a cancer patient. Oh, I’ll still write about those things, but I’ll also throw in lots of other bits of stuff. Stay tuned.

Happy birthday, David.